Ichabod Notables

Ichabod Notables H through M

We are proud to present some of our outstanding Ichabods. To learn more about each one, click on the + symbol next to their name. 

The Honorable Donald Read Heath (1894-1981)

The Honorable Donald Read Heath (1894-1981)The Honorable Donald Read Heath served 41 years in the U.S. Foreign Service, including 14 years as an ambassador to Bulgaria 1947-50; to Laos, Cambodia and South Vietnam 1950-54; to Lebanon 1955-59; to Yemen 1957-59; and to Saudi Arabia 1958-61. He joined the Foreign Service in 1920 and served as vice consul and then as consul in Bucharest, Warsaw, Berne and Haiti. He was first secretary of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin 1938-41 and served briefly in South America. In 1944, he was assigned as deputy political adviser to General Eisenhower and then served 1945-47 as director of political affairs, the U.S. Military Occupation of Germany. A Topeka native, Heath was enrolled at Washburn 1914-17 and joined Phi Theta Delta fraternity. His studies were interrupted by World War I, and he served in France with the Washburn Ambulance Corp. In 1920, he married Sue Louise Bell, ba 1918. He received a Distinguished Service Award from Washburn in 1950 and an honorary doctor of law was conferred on him in 1958.

Floyd Carl "Doc" Hedberg (1926-1995)

Floyd Hedberg

Floyd Carl “Doc” Hedberg, b music 1949, taught music at Washburn for more than 30 years and served 1982-92 as chairman of the music department, which grew significantly during his tenure. He also directed the Topeka Symphony Chorus and the choir at First United Methodist Church. He served as clinician and music festival adjudicator in Kansas and other states and was a member of the boards of the Sunflower Music Festival and the Topeka Community Concert Series. Hedberg was named Kansan of the Year in 1975 and was a Paul Harris Fellow. Washburn honored him with the Faculty Certificate of Merit in 1965, the Herrick Faculty Award for Outstanding Service in 1992 and the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1995. He was also inducted into the Kansas Music Educators Hall of Fame in 1995. He served in the military 1944-46 and taught in Long Island, Kan., and Paola, Kan., before joining the Washburn faculty in 1961. He earned a master’s degree from the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and a doctorate from the University of Northern Colorado, Greeley.

Mark V. Heitz (1952- )

Mark and Lisa Heitz

Mark V. Heitz, ba 1974, jd 1977, retired in 2012 as president of sales and distribution of Aviva USA, one of the largest insurance companies in the world. During a nearly 40-year career, Heitz served as a founding director and president of AmVestors Financial Corp. and as president of American Investors Life Insurance Co. Heitz became president and chief executive officer of the Topeka-based annuity operations of AmerUs Life Group of Des Moines, Iowa, when AmVestors merged with that company. Aviva purchased AmerUs in 2006. With his wife, Lisa Hefner Heitz, ba 1984, an author, he supports a number of endowed scholarships and funds in athletics, the English department, the School of Law, the general University and the Thomas Fox Averill Kansas Studies Collection Fund. He served on the Washburn Board of Regents and the Washburn University School of Law Board of Governors. Heitz serves as a Washburn University Foundation trustee. He received an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2000 and a Washburn Law Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. Washburn conferred an honorary doctor of law on him in 2001. His grandfather, Oscar Waggoner, graduated from the Washburn University School of Law in 1912.

John W. Henderson (1922-1999)

John W. HendersonJohn W. Henderson served 1965-81 as Washburn’s ninth president. He is credited with leading the effort to raise $50 million to rebuild Washburn after the majority of campus buildings were damaged or destroyed by a tornado in 1966. During his tenure, Carnegie Hall was repaired, Morgan Hall was expanded, the Garvey Fine Arts Center, School of Law and Mabee Library buildings were constructed and plans were initiated for the Petro Allied Health Center. The Henderson Learning Resources Center, which bears his name, opened in 1971. Henderson is also credited with expansion of international education and new academic programs, including establishment of the School of Business and a baccalaureate program in nursing as well as many associate degree programs. Prior to Washburn, Henderson served as president of Iowa Wesleyan College and dean of students at Western Illinois University. He received a bachelor’s degree from Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa., and master’s and doctorate degrees from Michigan State University. He received the Washburn University School of Law Honorary Life Membership Award in 1969.

Dr. William "Hardy" Hendren (1926- )

Dr. HendrenDr. William “Hardy” Hendren is a pioneer in reconstructive pediatric surgery and urology and a prolific researcher, educator and writer who has received numerous lifetime awards. In a career spanning more than 50 years and more than 20,000 patients, he earned the nickname “Hardy Human” for marathon operations, some longer than 24 hours, on babies and children with congenital defects such as cloaca syndrome, and he separated 15 sets of conjoined twins. He is the Distinguished Robert E. Gross Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.; emeritus chief of surgery at Children’s Hospital, Boston; and an honorary surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. His education at Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., was interrupted in 1943 by World War II. As part of his training as a Navy aviator, he enrolled in Washburn’s V-12 program and took premedical courses. He graduated from Dartmouth in 1948 and from Harvard Medical School in 1952.

The Honorable Delmas Carl Hill (1906-1989)

Delmas Carl HillThe Honorable Delmas Carl Hill, ba 1926, jd 1929, was appointed to the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy. He is the only Washburn University School of Law graduate to sit on the U.S. Court of Appeals, serving 16 years and taking senior status in 1977. Hill served 1949-61 as a judge for the District of Kansas and became chief judge in 1957. During World War II, he assisted with the prosecution of General Yamashita, commanding general in the Philippine Islands, before the Philippine Supreme Court and the U.S. Supreme Court. He received a Bronze Star from General Douglas MacArthur. Hill served 20 years on the Washburn College board of trustees and was instrumental in fundraising for the School of Law following the 1966 tornado. The Washburn University School of Law conferred an honorary doctor of law on him in 1958. He received the Washburn Law Distinguished Service Award in 1964 and a posthumous School of Law Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007.

Helen Marie Hocker (1915-2004)

Helen Hocker

Helen Marie Hocker advocated for women in physical education and collegiate athletics many years before Title IX. She joined Washburn in 1946 and began working to expand the majors offered in the athletics department. In 1951, she received a Fulbright appointment to The Hague, Netherlands, and became an advocate for international study programs and Washburn’s International House. In 1974, the department of health, physical education and recreation was formed, with Hocker serving as its first chairwoman until 1981. She served in numerous professional and community organizations, including 27 years on the Topeka Recreation Commission, which named the Helen Hocker Performing Arts Center in her honor. She received Washburn’s Lilla Day Monroe Award in 1976 and was named to the Washburn Athletics Hall of Fame in 1982. She earned a master’s degree from University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, and a bachelor’s degree from Central Missouri State University, Warrensburg, where she received the Distinguished Alumni Award in 1997.

Pamela Gail Hollie (1948- )

Pamela Hollie

Pamela Gail Hollie, ba 1970, began her career at the Wall Street Journal as a financial reporter, followed by 10 years with The New York Times as a foreign correspondent in Asia and a financial columnist in New York. Hollie produced a popular guide to economic and business journalism while teaching at Columbia University, New York, N.Y., and was the Kiplinger Professor at The Ohio State University, Columbus. She was a visiting professor at Washburn and received professional Fulbright awards to Malaysia and to the Czech Republic. Later specializing in international development for The Asia Foundation, she was the resident representative to the Philippines and Asia-Pacific and served with Asia-Pacific programs of The Nature Conservancy in Washington, D.C. Hollie holds a master’s degree from Columbia University, New York, N.Y. Washburn honored her with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1981 and conferred an honorary doctor of humane letters on her in 2004. She is married to novelist P.F. Kluge, writer-in-residence at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio.

Daniel D. Holt (1937- )

Dan Holt

Daniel D. Holt, ba 1963, served as director of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library and Museum, Abilene, Kan., from 1990 until his retirement in 2008. He lectured widely on military and western history, authored many articles and two books, and edited Eisenhower: The Prewar Diaries and Selected Papers, 1905-1941 (Johns Hopkins U. Press) and directed the publication of D-Day, June 6, 1944 (U. Press of Kansas). He held previous positions with the Kansas State Historical Society and served as director of The Citadel Museum and Archives, Charleston S.C.; Illinois Historical Society, Springfield, Ill.; the Liberty Memorial, Kansas City, Mo.; and the National Frontier Trails Center, Independence, Mo. He received a presidential appointment to the Brown v. Board of Education 50th Anniversary Commission. He is currently the managing editor for the George C. Marshall Foundation, publishing volume 6 of The Papers of George C. Marshall in 2013, which received the Arthur S. Link-Warren F. Kuel Prize for Documentary Editing and the Association for Documentary Editing’s Lyman Award. He is currently editing a forthcoming volume 7. He received a master’s degree from Emporia State University, Emporia, Kan. Among his other awards is a Department of Defense Award for his assistance on the 50th anniversary of D-Day in 1994. Washburn honored him with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2002.

John E. Howe (1919-2007)

John E. HoweJohn E. Howe was dean of the Washburn University School of Law 1959-1970 and a distinguished professor of law. He taught full time until 1978 and part time until 1981. During his tenure as dean, the 1966 tornado damaged many buildings, including Carnegie Hall, which housed the Law School. Howe led the effort to raise more than $1 million to construct a new building, which opened in 1969. He is also credited for maintaining academic standards when funding was scarce by recruiting active attorneys to teach part time. Prior to Washburn, he served seven years as assistant dean and faculty member at the St. Louis (Mo.) University School of Law and five years at Creighton University, Omaha, Neb. He earned a bachelor of arts degree from Western Kentucky University, a law degree from the University of Kentucky and a master’s in law degree from the University of Michigan.

Mark Alan Hunt (1949- )

Mark Alan Hunt (1949- )Mark Alan Hunt, ba 1971, had a long career as a history museum professional, retiring in 2005 from the Franklin R. Roosevelt Presidential Library in Hyde Park, N.Y.  He previously served 1996-2000 as director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., and 1990-96 as director of the Boy Scouts of America’s National Scouting Museum in Murray, Ky. He also served 10 years as director of the Kansas Museum of History, where he oversaw the planning, design and construction of the new museum in Topeka and then was director of museums and historic properties for the Kansas State Historical Society. He also taught graduate classes in museum administration at the University of Kansas, Lawrence. He has served on numerous boards, including the Mulvane Art Museum, the American Association for State and Local History, the Mountain-Plains Museum Association and the Southeastern Museums Conference. While a student, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. Washburn honored him as an Alumni Fellow in 1998. He earned a master’s degree in history from the Cooperstown Graduate Program, SUNY-Oneonta, New York.

* Thanks to Wichers Photography for the use of this image.

Glenn D. Hussey (1896-1986) and Catherine Conkling Hussey (1896-1982)

Glenn HusseyGlenn D. Hussey headed the Hussey Insurance Agency in Topeka and served as director and president of the Kansas Underwriters Association, president and a director of the Kansas Association of Insurance Agents, president of Topeka Insurers and president of the United Way of Greater Topeka. He attended Washburn 1916-17 and joined Phi Delta Theta fraternity. His education was interrupted by service in the Navy during World War I, and he graduated in 1919 from the University of Kansas, Lawrence.

Catherine HusseyCatherine Conkling Hussey, ba 1919, served as commissioner of the Topeka Girl Scouts during the completion of Camp Daisy Hindman, was a charter member and a president of Chapter CS of PEO and was active in the American Red Cross during World War II. As a student, she was a member of the Washburn Review student newspaper and Kaw yearbook staff and joined Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. An endowed fund in the couple’s name supports programs in Washburn’s School of Nursing.

Grace Sawyer Jones (1938- )

Grace Sawyer Jones

Grace Sawyer Jones, b ed 1960, retired in 2014 as president of Three Rivers Community College, Norwich, Conn. During her 13-year tenure, Three Rivers became one of the most technologically advanced community colleges in New England. Her career began in Chicago, Ill., where she taught secondary physical education and science. She served 10 years on the faculty at Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, Mass.; as vice president for multicultural affairs at the State University of New York, Oneonta; and as president of the College of Eastern Utah, Price. She has received many honors for professional and community service, including the Distinguished Alumna Award from Aurora University, Aurora, Ill. She was named the Oliver L. Brown Distinguished Visiting Scholar for Diversity Issues in 2000, and Washburn honored her with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1986. She received a master’s degree from George Williams College, Downers Grove, Ill., and a doctorate from Union Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio.

James Gilbert "Jim" Jones (1948- )

James JonesJames Gilbert “Jim” Jones, ba 1970, has worked 40 years in the banking, consumer lending, payment processing and related financial services profession. He serves as chairman and chief executive officer of AccountNow Inc., a leading provider of Visa and MasterCard prepaid debit cards, as chairman of Advanced Payment Solutions, an independent prepaid card issuer operating in the United Kingdom, and as chairman of the board of directors of FinanceIt, a Canadian consumer lender. He is also a member of the boards of directors of Merchant e-Solutions, Bora Payment Systems and National Mortgage Insurance Corp., and previously held senior management positions with some of the nation’s largest banks, including Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup. At Washburn, he was a member of Washburn Players and Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He holds a master’s degree in industrial psychology from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and a master of business administration degree from the University of Kansas, Lawrence.

John Daniel Kemp (1949- )

John KempJohn Daniel Kemp, jd 1974, is widely respected for his many achievements, both in the corporate and non‐profit worlds. As a person who uses four prostheses, he has dedicated much of his career to helping others. He is president and chief executive officer of The Viscardi Center, formerly known as Abilities!, and has served on the Medicaid Commission and the State Department’s Advisory Committee on Persons with Disabilities, which guides the secretary of state and the administrator of the Agency for International Development in the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy and assistance with respect to people with disabilities. He was a partner at the Washington, D.C., law firm of Powers, Pyles, Sutter and Verville, P.C. Among his honors are the David Award; the Henry B. Betts Award in 2006, regarded as America’s highest honor for disability leadership and service; and the Horatio Alger Award in 1991. Washburn honored him as a 1997 Alumni Fellow and conferred an honorary doctor of law on him in 2003. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., in 1971.

James Albert "Jim" Klaushman (1951- )

James Albert “Jim” Klausman (1951- )James Albert “Jim” Klausman, ba 1974, is president and chief executive officer of Midwest Health Inc., which manages senior living centers, including assisted living, skilled nursing centers and senior independent living apartments in Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Oklahoma. He also serves as president, board chairman and district vice president of the Kansas Health Care Association, is a past chairman of the Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce and a past board chairman of Junior Achievement of Northeast Kansas. He also serves as a member of the boards of St. Francis Health, Community Bank, LTC 100 and Downtown Topeka, Inc., serves on the advisory board of US Bank and is a member of Sales and Marketing Executives of Topeka. He was appointed to the Washburn Board of Regents in 2010 by Gov. Mark Parkinson and served as board chairman 2011-12. He also served as a director of the Washburn University Foundation Board of Trustees 2011-13.

Cha Too Koo (1932- )

Cha Too KooCha Too Koo, bba 1957, was president of Gold Star Software Ltd. He retired from LG Industries Inc. (formerly Lucky-Goldstar Group), a South Korean multinational company and subsidiary of the LG Group, which has more than 50 different subsidiaries ranging from chemicals and electronics to energy and finance. He has been a benefactor of Washburn, supporting scholarships for international students. He earned a master’s degree in business administration from New York City College in 1959. Washburn conferred an honorary doctor of commerce on him in 1986.

William H. "Bill" Kurtis (1940- )

Portrait of Bill Kurtis

William H. “Bill” Kurtis, jd 1966, is a journalist, producer and author whose career began in Topeka, Kan., at WIBW-TV (CBS), where his outstanding 24-hour coverage of the 1966 tornado led to a position at WBBM-TV in Chicago. He anchored the CBS Morning News in New York City and then returned to WBBM in Chicago as an anchorman, where he served until 1991. He founded Kurtis Productions in 1990 and produced Investigative Reports and Cold Case Files and anchored American Justice. A conservationist, he operates a ranch near Sedan, Kan., where he markets organic grass-fed beef. He authored three books, including The Death Penalty on Trial: Crisis in American Justice, and has received numerous humanitarian, journalism and broadcasting awards, including Emmys, CableACE Awards, the Thurgood Marshall Award and Distinguished Kansan of the Year from the Native Sons and Daughters of Kansas. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas, Lawrence. He received the Washburn University School of Law Distinguished Service Award in 1999 and the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1982. In 1985, Washburn conferred on him an honorary doctor of literature.

* Photo courtesy of Andrew Eccles

Theo Cobb Landon (1898-1996)

Theo Cobb LandonTheo Cobb Landon, ba 1919, was First Lady of Kansas during the two terms Alf Landon served as governor, 1933-1937, and was mother of U.S. Senator Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker. She served 30 years as a trustee of the Washburn Endowment Association, now the Washburn University Foundation, and was the first female to serve as board chairwoman. Landon also served on the boards of the Community Concert, Red Cross, Florence Crittenton Home and the United Way and was a member of the YWCA Advisory Council and the Shawnee County Mental Health Planning Council. She was a musician and an honorary member of the Oklahoma chapter of the American Harp Society. Washburn honored her with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1969. In 1974, Washburn conferred on her an honorary doctor of humanities.

Charlotte Mendell Leavitt (1867-1958)

Charlotte Mendell LeavittCharlotte Mendell Leavitt is credited with originating Washburn’s motto, non nobis solum, or “Not for ourselves alone.” Leavitt joined the Washburn faculty in 1899 as an English literature instructor and dean of women. In 1903, she was promoted to professor and later became head of the English department. She was an early member of Nonoso, Washburn’s honorary society for women, which began in 1917. She retired in 1940 after 41 years of service. Prior to Washburn, she taught high school for six years in Michigan. She received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree from Columbia University, New York, N.Y., and also studied at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Washburn conferred an honorary doctor of literature on her in 1925.

Charlotte Mendell Leavitt (1867-1958)

Charlotte LevittCharlotte Mendell Leavitt is credited with originating Washburn’s motto, non nobis solum, or “Not for ourselves alone.” Leavitt joined the Washburn faculty in 1899 as an English literature instructor and dean of women. In 1903, she was promoted to professor and later became head of the English department. She was an early member of Nonoso, Washburn’s honorary society for women, which began in 1917. She retired in 1940 after 41 years of service. Prior to Washburn, she taught high school for six years in Michigan. She received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree from Columbia University, New York, N.Y., and also studied at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Washburn conferred an honorary doctor of literature on her in 1925.

William A. “Bill” Langdon (1934-2004)

William A. “Bill” Langdon (1934-2004)William A. “Bill” Langdon, ba 1959, joined Washburn’s faculty in 1964 and served as associate professor and chair of the modern foreign languages department, retiring from Washburn in 2002 after 38 years of service. In 1987, he was named director of International Programs and served 15 years in that position. During his tenure, international student enrollment grew from 30 to 200, the average number of Washburn students studying abroad annually grew from four to 60, and faculty support and participation in these programs also increased. Langdon established official relationships with 14 foreign institutions such as Fukuoka University in Japan and University of Klagenfurt in Austria, and spent much time studying in Germany, traveling on Fulbright awards and on numerous Sweet Sabbaticals. Prior to Washburn, he taught French and German at Ottawa University, Kan., and the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kan. An Army veteran of Korea, he earned a master’s degree in French and German from Emporia State University, Kan., and a doctorate in German from the University of Kansas, Lawrence.

Delano Eugene Lewis (1938- )

Delano LewisDelano Eugene Lewis, jd 1963, was nominated by President Bill Clinton in 1999 and confirmed by the U. S. Senate in 1999 as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of South Africa. He also served with the Department of Justice and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. In 1966, Lewis served as associate director of the Peace Corps in Nigeria and country director in Uganda culminating as chief of the East and Southern Africa Division. Lewis also served as president and chief executive officer of National Public Radio and as president and chief executive officer of District of Columbia operations of Bell Atlantic, now Verizon. He served as director of international relations institute and interim dean for international programs at New Mexico State University 2006-11. He was named Kansan of the Year by the Topeka Capital-Journal in 1999 and by the Native Sons and Daughters of Kansas in 2009. Washburn honored him with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1989 and conferred an honorary doctor of law on him in 2000. He received the Washburn Law Distinguished Service Award in 2003 and the Washburn Law Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007. The Arkansas City, Kan., native earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas.

Joseph Glenn Logan (1891-1988)

Joseph Logan Joseph Glenn Logan, ba 1915, jd 1917, was a founding member of Alpha Delta fraternity and served 16 years on the Washburn Board of Regents. An attorney and civic leader, he served two terms as Shawnee County attorney, two terms in the Kansas Senate and nearly 20 years as Topeka’s postmaster. At the outset of World War II, Logan was special attorney for the Justice Department for the acquisition of land for military installations, including Forbes Air Force Base, and was a member of Topeka’s first police and fire department civil service commission. A charter member and first president of the Topeka Rose Society, the J. Glenn Logan All America Rose Selections Test Gardens were established in Gage Park in his honor. Washburn honored him with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1962. He was named a Sagamore Distinguished Alumni in 1984, and Topeka honored him with the Medal of Service in 1981. He was married for 71 years to Corinne Ripley Logan (1892-1989), ba 1915.

David Earl "Davey" Lopes (1945- )

David Earl “Davey” Lopes (1945- )David Earl “Davey” Lopes, b ed 1969, had a 16-year career playing Major League baseball 1972-87. He played in four World Series, won the World Series with the Dodgers in 1981 and ranks 26th all-time in the Major League with 557 stolen bases. Lopes played second base for the Dodgers 1972-81 and also played for the Athletics, the Cubs and the Astros. He has served 28 years as a Major League coach, is currently in his fourth season with the Dodgers and is widely recognized as one of the best base-running coaches in baseball. He won the 2008 World Series while coaching the Philadelphia Phillies and has also coached the Padres, Nationals, Orioles and Brewers. At Washburn, he earned National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) All-American honors in both basketball and baseball, including honors for his batting average and home run record. He was inducted into the Washburn Athletics Hall of Fame in 1987.

* This photo is used with the permission of Jon Soohoo, LA Dodgers

Bill Malloy (1952- )

Bill MalloyBill Malloy, ba 1974, retired in 2014 as chief marketing officer of Sprint with more than 30 years of experience in senior operating roles with marketing, media and wireless companies ranging from start-up ventures to large corporate entities. He was involved in the wireless industry as it developed, joining McCaw Cellular in 1985 after an 11-year career in senior operating and partner positions in advertising firms and media companies. After McCaw merged with AT&T to form AT&T Wireless, he served as executive vice president of U.S. operations and was the architect of AT&T Digital One Rate, the first national wireless calling plan. In 2002, he joined Ignition Partners as a venture partner and member of the wireless communications team and represented the firm as chairman and chief executive officer of Sparkplug Communications. He also served as chief executive officer of two Internet companies, Peapod and Worldstream Communications. He is a graduate of Kellogg Management Institute at Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management, Evanston, Ill.

Richetta Ann Manager (1953- )

Richetta ManagerRichetta Ann Manager, ba 1975, had a long career as the lead soprano for the Gelsenkirchen Opera in Germany. Her extensive opera repertoire includes roles from Verdi to Wagner, and she also performs concerts of gospel, rock, pop, jazz, soul and other modern genres across Europe and in the United States. Listed in International Who’s Who in Music, she has performed all the major soprano roles. She sang in the debut of the opera “New Year” at the Houston Grand Opera, participated in a filming of “New Year” for BBC Television and performed in concert at the Royal Festival Hall in London. As a Washburn student, she was inducted into Sigma Alpha Iota. She has returned to Topeka for recitals and concerts, including a 2014 concert commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. She studied at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., and the University of Colorado. Washburn honored her as an Alumni Fellow in 2005.

Dale C. Marcoux (1907-1986)

Dale Marcoux

Dale C. Marcoux served 34 years at Washburn, retiring in 1973 as professor of economics and chairman of the department of economics and business administration. He is credited for laying the foundation of the School of Business, which was established in 1973. An outstanding professor, Marcoux is remembered for encouraging former students to return to class reunions, where he unsealed economic predictions they had made in his economics policy class. His support of students with leadership ability is reflected in his $1.9 million bequest, which established many full-ride leadership scholarships in the School of Business. Marcoux served three years in the Navy during World War II and also taught at Circleville (Kan.) High School and Southwestern College in Winfield, Kan. Marcoux earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and received a doctorate from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Hugh Glenn McCausland, Jr. (1918-2000) & Margaret Southworth McCausland (1924-2012)

Margaret McCauslandHugh McCausland

Hugh Glenn McCausland Jr. joined the Washburn faculty in 1951 as instructor of speech and theatre with a joint appointment as resident director of the Topeka Civic Theatre. He studied acting and appeared in off-Broadway and metropolitan New York City area productions and earned a bachelor’s degree at Lynchburg (Va.) College. He directed Washburn’s theatre productions for many years and appeared in many shows for Topeka Civic Theatre and other performing groups. Margaret Southworth McCausland received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She was a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and also served on the faculty at Lake Erie (Wis.) College for Women. She joined the Washburn English faculty in 1955 and she and Hugh married in 1957. They traveled on three joint Sweet Sabbaticals to Eastern Europe and were members of the Friends of Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library. They retired together and both received faculty emeritus status in 1983.

Marion “Mac” McDonald

Marion Marion “Mac” McDonald was Washburn’s head basketball coach 1951-60. After eight winning seasons, McDonald retired from basketball in 1960, posting a 102-67 overall record and winning the Central Intercollegiate Conference (CIC) championship in 1952. McDonald is credited with re-establishing Washburn’s baseball program in 1957 and producing four winning teams to win the CIC championship in 1963. He was inducted into the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Hall of Fame. As the first president of the NAIA Baseball Association, he played a substantial role in establishing the NAIA Baseball Tournament and worked as a professional baseball scout for the Brooklyn Dodgers. McDonald retired from coaching baseball in 1965 and then served until 1978 as director of Washburn’s financial aid and placement programs. With his son, Bill, b ed 1967, he was inducted into the 1977 Washburn Athletic Hall of Fame. In the 1930s, he graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Fort Hays State University and a master’s degree from George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn.

The Honorable Kay E. McFarland (1935-2015)

Kay McFarlandThe Honorable Kay E. McFarland, ba 1957, jd 1964, served 13 years as chief justice of the Kansas Supreme Court. Her groundbreaking judicial career began in 1971 when she became judge of the probate and juvenile courts, the first female elected to a judgeship in Shawnee County. In 1973, she was elected to the Fifth Division of the District Court in Topeka, becoming the first female district judge in Kansas. Another first for a female came in 1977, when the governor appointed McFarland to a seat on the Kansas Supreme Court. She was retained in office by statewide vote until her retirement in 2009. In 1995, she became the first female chief justice of the Kansas Supreme Court. She was named a Washburn University School of Law Alumni Fellow in 2005 and received the Washburn Law Distinguished Alumni Award in 2006 and the Washburn Law Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007. In 2009, Washburn conferred on her an honorary doctor of law.

Margaret M. McGurnaghan (1876-1963)

Margaret McGurnaghanMargaret M. McGurnaghan, ba 1925, jd 1927, was among the first women to practice law in Kansas, among the first female members of the Kansas Bar Association (KBA) and the first woman partner in a large law firm, where she previously had worked 25 years as a stenographer. She served the KBA 1945-49 as secretary-treasurer, was the first chairwoman of its title standards committee and was active in the American Bar Association. During World War II, McGurnaghan was prominently involved in legal aid work for military members and throughout her career supported college scholarships for women. She specialized in probate, real estate and foreclosures and taught abstracts and title law conveyancing classes at Washburn Law, beginning in 1936 and continuing most years through 1959. She was 51 years old when she began her 33-year law practice, retiring in 1960 at the age of 84. Washburn Law honored her with a posthumous Law Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

Peter McVicar (1852-1903)

Peter McVicarPeter McVicar was Washburn’s second president, 1871-96, the last year on a leave of absence. As the longest-tenured president to date, McVicar is credited with establishing Washburn’s place in higher education by recruiting and retaining capable faculty members. Over two decades, he led successful fundraising efforts to construct the buildings and plant the thousands of trees that characterized the campus for 90 years. The chapel was named in his honor in 1902, but the stone above the doorway was etched incorrectly as MacVicar, now the name of the street that borders the west side of campus. McVicar came to Topeka in 1860 and was an original member of the Lincoln College, now Washburn University, board of trustees. In the 11 years before becoming Washburn’s president, he served as pastor of First Congregational Church and state superintendent of public instruction. He earned a bachelor’s degree in 1856 from Beloit (Wis.) College and a bachelor of divinity degree from Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary in 1860.

Gerald "Jerry" Michaud (1929-2005)

Jerry and Shannon Michaud

Gerald “Jerry” Michaud, ba 1951, jd 1951, was a preeminent Kansas trial attorney, nationally recognized for his pioneering efforts in product liability and medical negligence litigation. He was a member of the prestigious Inner Circle of Advocates. For more than 50 years, he practiced law in Wichita, Kan. Michaud served as president of the Kansas Trial Lawyers Association and was admitted to the Kansas and U.S. District Court, Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. He served two terms on the Washburn University School of Law Board of Governors, and his law firm established the James R. Ahrens Chair, now the Distinguished Visiting Professor. With his wife, Shannon, he donated to Washburn the bronze “Wings of Freedom” eagle and bronze life-size statues of Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. Washburn conferred on him an honorary doctor of law in 1986. In 1997, Washburn honored him with the President’s Award and in 1997 with the Washburn University School of Law Distinguished Service Award.

Harry Joseph Middleton, Jr. (1921- )

Harry Middleton

Harry Joseph Middleton Jr. served 1972-2002 as director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library in Austin, Texas. He studied at Washburn 1941-43, but World War II interrupted his education. Following his Army service, he finished his bachelor’s degree at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, and began a career as a journalist and freelance writer. In 1967, his work with a presidential commission led to a position as a speechwriter for President Lyndon Johnson. In January 1969, Johnson asked Middleton to move to Austin, Texas, to help him write his memoirs. The following year, Johnson tapped him as his library director. Middleton is credited with establishing a preeminent and accessible presidential library. In his honor, Lady Bird Johnson created the Harry Middleton Fellowship and Harry Middleton Lectureship at the LBJ Foundation. After retirement, he taught a class on Johnson at the University of Texas, Austin, stepping down at the age of 91.

The Honorable Loren R. Miller (1903-1967)

Loren MillerThe Honorable Loren R. Miller, jd 1928, was a prominent attorney in the early civil rights movement, primarily representing clients who were fighting discrimination in housing. He was the first lawyer to win a verdict outlawing racial discrimination in real estate sales financed by the Federal Housing Administration and Veterans Administration. In 1948, with Thurgood Marshall, Miller won a case before the U.S. Supreme Court that declared agreements barring persons from owning property on racial grounds cannot be enforced by the courts. In 1953, Miller won a similar case in California, and in 1954, he wrote two appellate briefs for the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case. In 1964, Gov. Edmund Brown appointed him to the Superior Court of California. In his honor, the State Bar of California established the Loren Miller Legal Services Award. In 1968, the Loren Miller Bar Association was founded. Washburn Law honored Miller with a posthumous Law Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

Billie Jean Moore (1943- )

Billie Jean MooreBillie Jean Moore, b ed 1966, is one of the most successful coaches in women’s intercollegiate basketball, compiling a record of 436-196 in 24 seasons. She won a national championship in 1970, her first year at California State University-Fullerton, where she coached eight years. She coached 16 years at the University of California-Los Angeles, winning a national championship in 1978. She was chosen to coach the first USA Olympic women’s basketball team, which won a silver medal in Montreal in 1976. In 1999, she was named to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame. In 2002, she received the Naismith Women’s Outstanding Contribution to Basketball Award. She was named to the Washburn Athletic Hall of Fame in 1978 and received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award from Washburn in 1995. Washburn conferred an honorary doctor of humane letters on her in 1999. She holds a master’s degree from Southern Illinois University.

The Honorable Nancy Louise Moritz (1960- )

The Honorable Nancy Louise Moritz (1960- )The Honorable Nancy Louise Moritz, bba 1982, jd 1985, received a lifetime appointment in 2014 as a federal judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit after being nominated by President Barack Obama. The Tenth Circuit, located in Denver, hears appeals from Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah and Wyoming. Moritz began her career as a research attorney to Justice Harold Herd of the Kansas Supreme Court and also served as a law clerk to Judge Patrick F. Kelly with the U.S. District Court in Wichita, Kan. She then worked six years as a litigation associate with Spencer Fane Britt and Browne. In 1995, she was named an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Kansas City, Kan., and in 1999, became the Appellate Coordinator for the U.S. Attorney’s office. In 2004, Gov. Kathleen Sebelius appointed Moritz to the Kansas Court of Appeals. In 2010, she was appointed by Gov. Mark Parkinson to the Supreme Court of Kansas, where she served three years.

Louis E "Gene" Mosiman (1937- )

Gene MosimanLouis E. “Gene” Mosiman, bba 1961, served nearly 40 years at Washburn, retiring in 1998 after 17 years as vice president of administration and treasurer. He was employed at Washburn by Richard G. Vogel, who was his mentor. He joined Washburn in 1961 as bookstore manager and later was promoted to assistant treasurer, business manager and vice president for financial affairs and treasurer. He served with seven Washburn presidents and was business manager in 1966 when the tornado hit the Washburn campus. Mosiman was instrumental in forming the Washburn Law Foundation and served on its board of directors. He also served on the boards of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas and the Menninger Lecture Series. The Washburn University Board of Regents bestowed the title vice president emeritus on him in April 1998, and the Washburn Law School Association made him an honorary life member in 1998. He was secretary/treasurer of the Kansas District of the Optimist Club and an ex officio member of the Washburn University Foundation Board of Trustees. The Topeka Breakfast Optimist Club awarded him with life membership and distinguished president honors, and Washburn honored him with an Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1999.

Margaret Thompson Murdock (1942- )

Margaret MurdockMargaret Thompson Murdock, bsn 1977, is a world marksmanship champion and a pioneer in women’s sports. She won a 1976 Olympic open silver medal (there were no women’s events), seven individual world championships and seven Pan American Games gold medals. She set 13 world records. In the 1967 Pan American Games, she became the first woman to break a men’s world record in any sport. Murdock graduated in 1965 from Kansas State University, Manhattan, with the distinction of being the first woman to letter in a sport. Murdock served 1965-71 as a shooting instructor at the Army marksmanship unit in Fort Benning, Ga., was a member of the U.S. shooting team for 10 years and retired from the Army Reserve in 1993 at the rank of major. A retired nurse anesthetist, she earned a bachelor’s degree in nurse anesthesia from the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, in 1980. She has been inducted into numerous national and international shooting halls of fame, including the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame.