Undergraduate Catalog Addenda

14-15 Undergraduate Addenda

Authorized Academic Load

Normally, the maximum number of hours permitted is 20 per semester. Correspondence, extension, and evening courses taken concurrently are counted as a part of the total load. A freshman is limited to 17 credit hours per semester except upon approval by the faculty advisor and the appropriate Dean. Superior Juniors and Seniors, with the approval of their faculty advisor, may petition the Dean to carry 21 or more hours.

For summer sessions, the maximum number of hours permitted concurrently is 9, provided that no more than 6 are taken in the same early or late session or shorter term. Superior students may petition the appropriate Dean for permission to enroll in more hours. Normally the term superior will be construed to mean a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0.

The following catalog descriptions were approved by General Faculty and need to be added to the 2014/2015 Undergraduate Catalog addendum.  

 Art

  • Art Requirement Change in the B.A. in Art History Degree  (Page 95)

Biology

  • Biology New Program:  BS in Environmental Biology  (Page 106)
  • Biology New Program:  BA in Environmental Biology  (Page 106)
  • Biology New Program, BS in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology  (Page 107)
  • Changes in the BS Biology Degree:  change of the core biology requirements for the degree. (Page 105)
  • Changes in the BA Biology Degree:  change in the core biology requirements for the degree. (Page 105)
  • Changes in the BS Degree for Secondary Education Specialization (Page 106)
  • Deleted: BA in Biology with Secondary Education Emphasis

Chemistry Curriculum Change for Associate degree in Laboraory Science

Changing the Associate of Science in Laboratory Science to an Associate of Arts in Laboratory Science will allow Washburn Pre-Pharmacy students an easier time meeting the KU Core requirements and gain more flexibility in the courses they may take at Washburn University without compromisiong rigor.  This change will greatly benefit the students in the Pharmacy path. 

Communication Department

  • Communication department name changed to Communication Studies  (Page 116)

Computer Information Sciences

  • Changes in BA degree for Computer Information Sciences  (Page 119)

General Education/Transfer Credits

  • Change in the distribution of General Education for the Associate of Science (AS) degree only (Pages 78, 81)
  • Changes in the Transfer of International Credit    (Pages 75,76)

Kinesiology

  • Changes in the BEd in Physical Education Teaching  (Page 81)

Music/History

  • MU 106 is crosslisted with HI 105 Introduction to World Music and its History.  MU 106 is NOT cross listed with AN 120.  (Pages 91, 148, 188)

Philosophy/Religious Studies

  • Changes in the BA for Philosophy  ( Page 194)

(Revised) Student Learning Outcomes for Philosophy  (Page 195)

Philosophy students at Washburn University, upon graduation, are expected to be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to think critically, using both natural and artificial languages;
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the major figures and movements in Ancient, Modern, and Contemporary Philosophy;
  3. Explain important theories and the views of major figures in Metaphysics and Epistemology;
  4. Explain important theories and the views of major figures in Value Theory;
  5. Formulate and evaluate philosophical positions critically and systematically;
  6. Construct well-reasoned, well-integrated essays based on philosophical research; and
  7. Defend philosophical positions in an oral format.
(Revised) Mission Statement for Philosophy 

Consistent with the mission of the University and the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Philosophy is dedicated to providing high quality undergraduate courses in philosophy and religion, to providing the educational foundations for life-long critical thinking, to engaging in research and scholarly activities in these and related areas and to serving the University and its various communities. The Department emphasizes excellence in teaching undergraduate students.  (Page 194)

 (Revised) Student Learning Outcomes for Religious Studies  (Page 211)

Philosophy students at Washburn University, upon graduation, are expected to be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the subject matter of, and various methods used in, the academic study of religion.
  2. Describe the nature and diversity of world religions.
  3. Demonstrate competence in a concentrated area of religious studies.
  4. Assess various theories, concepts, and materials (e.g., written texts, oral reports, archaeological data) central to the academic study of religion.
  5. Conduct and present research in written form.
  6. Orally explain and defend positions taken in written research.

Physics

  • Physics New Program: Associate of Science degree in Engineering-Physics  (Pages 51, 198)

School of Business

New Concentration for the BBA Degree in Business: Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Pedagogical models for entrepreneurship include, among others; problem-based learning, learning through apprenticeship, action and experiential learning, competition, role-playing, simulation, opportunity-identification activities and multiple case studies. The proposed model designed for the EI program includes several of these methods, but is modeled specifically on the action and experiential-based learning model. The following curriculum was developed through extensive secondary and primary research conducted by Washburn faculty on entrepreneurship programs throughout the U.S. and abroad since 2008. All courses have already been approved by School of Business faculty and have been taught as part of the Entrepreneurship certificate.

Course requirements: Four courses (12 credit hours) for the EI concentration:

i. Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Creativity (BU343)

ii. Entrepreneurial Marketing (BU369)

iii. Entrepreneurial Finance for Small Business (BU389)

iv. Entrepreneurship Clinic (BU470)

It is recommended that the required courses be sequential. The logic behind this approach is that the first class (BU343) many ideas are generated, these ideas are then trimmed through feasibility analysis and for market potential, then matched with marketing resources and planning in the Entrepreneurial Marketing (EM369) course. The remaining ideas are then analyzed for financial feasibility in the Entrepreneurial Finance for Small Business (BU389). A financial plan is developed that reduces the number of potential, feasible business ideas to a final new venture opportunity. Finally the new venture opportunity is either further refined and/or acted upon in the capstone class the Entrepreneurship Clinic (BU470).

New Concentration for the BBA Degree in Business:  International Business   (Page 282)

 The international business curriculum is designed to equip graduates with skills suitable for employment at international and global enterprises. A student would understand advantages and challenges of doing business globally, understand different cultures and be able to perform business tasks in a different cultural and professional environment.

The following courses are required for the International Business concentration:

  • BU356 Cross-Cultural Management
  • BU368 International Marketing
  • EC410 International Economics or BU477 International Finance
  • BU457 Multinational Enterprise Practices
  • Twelve additional upper-division elective hours in accounting, business, or economics
  • One of the following:
    • BU 406 International Business and Entrepreneurship Experience* or
    • No less than 3 credit hours earned through a university-approved study abroad or an international internship,* or
    • 6 credit hours of course work in one of the modern foreign languages at the intermediate level or above.

* Credits earned can be counted towards the fulfillment of the twelve AC/BU/EC credit hour requirement.

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Required Courses for RN to BSN Program

 NU103 Power Up: Success for Online Learners (1)

This course focuses on preparing students to for success in the online learning environment.  Designed to introduce the student to the Washburn University learning management system and procedures for navigating, available support services, time management skills, strategies for learning online, netiquette, and self-assessment of learning styles.  Students will validate computer literacy and confirm they have the proper technology to work within online courses.

IS172 Advanced Research Strategies for RNs (1)

Designed to introduce and improve advanced research strategies for nursing majors.  Students will focus on and create artifacts related to nursing research. 

NU301 Applied Pharmacology for RNs (3)  

This course builds on previously learned knowledge of anatomy, physiology, chemistry, and genetics. The course introduces concepts of pharmacologic therapy for collaborative nursing practice.  Selected medication categories are studied with emphasis on nursing responsibility, accountability, and safety.  Case study based critical thinking exercises further focuses learning on lifespan issues, patient assessment, and therapeutic response.  

NU317 Health Assessment for RNs I (2) 

This course focuses on the complete health assessment, the nursing process, and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of disease in patients across the life span.  This course expands existing skills and knowledge processes of health assessment to include: interviewing, history-taking, and physical assessment.  Dominant models, theories, and perspectives are used to explain health behavior and considered in relation to evidence-based health promotion and health education strategies.  Students are also expected to identify and apply pathophysiological principles to selected health issues across the lifespan.  Incorporated throughout the course is the importance of communication and collaboration across culturally diverse urban populations.

NU319 Health Assessment for RNs II (2)

This course focuses on the complete health assessment, the nursing process, and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of disease in patients across the life span.  This course expands existing skills and knowledge processes of health assessment to include: interviewing, history-taking, and physical assessment.  Dominant models, theories, and perspectives are used to explain health behavior and considered in relation to evidence-based health promotion and health education strategies.  Students are also expected to identify and apply pathophysiological principles to selected health issues across the lifespan.  Incorporated throughout the course is the importance of communication and collaboration across culturally diverse urban populations. Prerequisite: NU317.

NU321 Professional Transformation (1)

Introduction to professional nursing expectations.  Learning to establish therapeutic relationships as the foundation of professional nursing practice and personal accountability.  The communication theory of TEAMSTEPPS will be incorporated throughout the course.  The value of self-care and reflection in relation to professional transformation is also explored.

NU323 Pathophysiology I (2)

This course focuses on the basic concepts of the pathological factors that influence the disease process.  Emphasis is on understanding the disruptive mechanisms that impact normal cell function and the physiological responses to the disease process.  Risk factors and disease prevention are discussed to provide a foundation for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management. Prerequisite or taken concurrently NU317 Health Assessment for RNs I

 NU327 Pathophysiology II (2)

This course presents the pathophysiology of the most common alterations according to body system.  The course focuses on the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the most common diseases of a specific organ system. Risk factors and disease prevention are discussed to provide a foundation for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management. Prerequisite: NU323 and NU319 (NU 319 can be taken concurrently)

NU329 Introduction to Nursing Informatics (2)

This course provides a systematic application of information and computer technology to related nursing practice.  Emphasis is on integrating nursing practice systems and information technology.  Examination of the evolution, future, and role of nursing informatics is discussed.

NU341 Evidence-based Nursing (2 hrs.)

This course emphasizes appraisal of research studies as the foundation for evidence-based nursing practice.

NU451 Leadership, Management, & Health Policy (2)

Leadership skills that emphasize ethical and critical decision-making, initiating and maintaining effective working relationships, communication and collaboration within inter-professional healthcare teams, care coordination, delegation, and developing conflict resolution strategies.  A basic understanding of complex systems and the impact of power, politics, policy, and regulatory guidelines to these systems.

NU463 Quality & Safety in Healthcare (2)

System leadership, quality improvement, and safety concepts are presented to promote high quality nursing practice in healthcare settings.  Emphasis is placed on the application of evidence-based knowledge from the contemporary sciences and communication with inter-professional healthcare team members.

NU467 Clinical Prevention & Population Health Management/Practicum (4)

This population focused nursing course will use the ecological model to explore the determinants of health of aggregates, communities, and populations.  Emphasis on public health science and epidemiology principles will guide students in the identification of the social, cultural, environmental, and legislative issues within complex community systems.  During the practicum, students will examine clinical prevention and health promotion strategies for effectiveness, efficiency and equity, work collaboratively with other health care professionals to identify resources and strategies that contribute to the population overall health status.

NU495 Leadership Capstone Seminar/Practicum (4)

Students will integrate all previous theoretical and clinical learning in a role not experienced within his/her current job.  Clinical experience consolidates leadership skills to practice coordination and delegation of care.  Seminars assist the student to process the clinical experience and focus on ethical, leadership, management, and practice issues.

STUDENT RECORDS

Policy, Procedure, and Records   (Page 58)

 Washburn University maintains various student records to document academic work and to record interac­tions with University staff and officials. The Family Educa­tional Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) was enacted to protect each student’s right to privacy and to provide each student the right to inspect and review his/her edu­cation records. This Act is also commonly known as the Buckley Amendment. A notice of this policy is published each semester/term in the Registration Information Guide and by email each semester to all students.  For purposes of FERPA, “student” is defined as an individual who is or has been in attendance at Washburn University.  At the University, an individual is considered “in attendance” when he or she has attended a class.

FEES AND FINANCIAL AID

FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS:

Tuition and fees are established by the Washburn University Board of Regents and are subject to change.  Once a student has enrolled in classes, she or he is liable for tuition and fee charges unless the student withdraws from all classes via the web before the end of the 100% refund period.  Your financial aid eligibility may change if you withdraw from one or more classes, leaving you with a balance due on your student account.  You may wish to check with the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawing from classes.  Payments can be made online in WU-VIEW (formerly known as IBOD), which can be accessed through MyWashburn, Financial Services tab.  Payments may also be made by mail, by phone, or in person at the Student Service Center in 177 Morgan Hall.  The Business Office is open between 8 AM and 5 PM Monday through Friday, except on Wednesday in 175 Morgan Hall.  On Wednesday office hours are 8:30 AM – 5 PM.  Washburn University accepts cash, checks, e-checks, debit cards and credit cards (VISA, MasterCard, Discover and American Express) for the payment of tuition and fee charges.  There is a convenience fee of 2.75% assessed on each credit card transaction, and all credit card payments must be made online through WU-VIEW.

All tuition and fee changes must be paid, or an installment plan set up, by the published “last day to pay without a late fee” to avoid penalties (more below).  An installment plan may be set up in WU-VIEW, accessed through MyWashburn, Financial Services tab.  There is a $30 setup fee for the installment plan and a $25 late fee for installments not paid on time. Installment payments may be made online in WU-VIEW, by mail, by phone, or in person at the Business Office.  Students or an authorized user may set up scheduled payments in WU-VIEW to automatically pay installments from a bank account (currently available) or a debit card (beginning during the Fall 2014 term). Credit cards may not be used for automatic payments.  E-mail reminders will be sent to students and authorized users who schedule payments.