newsletters

Newsletter 1991

SPEAKING OF KANSAS

Washburn Center for Kansas Studies 1991 Newsletter

1991-1992 Calendar

October 19 Encounter on the Plains
January 29 Kansas Day Program
Spring Tour
Speaking of Kansas Series

SPEAKING OF KANSAS - FALL 1991
Washburn Center for Kansas Studies
1700 College
Topeka, KS  66621
(913) 231-1010 Ex. 1163
Director: Ross Johnson

1991 Committee
Dr. Tom Averill, English
Dr. Lyke Baker, Education
Dr. Barbara Burgess, Communications Studies
Dr. Bill Cecil-Fronsman, History
Dr. Daniel Hardin, Education
Rob Hull, Business
John Hunter, Theatre
Dr. Ross Johnson, Biology
Wilma Rife, Library
Dr. Sara Tucker, History
Ann Ukena, Math
Rachel Vukas, Library
Dr. Bill Wagnon, History
Dr. Tom Wolf, Biology

Newsletter Editor: Barbara Burgess
Nameplate designed by Sara Kidney

BOOK REVIEWS

KANSAS FACTS: A COMPREHENSIVE LOOK AT KANSAS TODAY, COUNTY BY COUNTY,
John Clements, ed.  Dallas, Texas: Clements Research II, 1990.
by Rachel Vukas

     Local statistics and information can be difficult to find.  A new publication, titled KANSAS FACTS, provides a wide variety of information on
the state and county level.  An overview of the state is given first, and then each of the 105 counties is discussed.
     The following information is given for each county: climate, including average temperatures, precipitation and snowfall; population by race, sex and ages; major industries, natural resoureces, home values, newspapers, radio and TV stations, available community services, historic sites and recreation areas. The information is presented in a narrative, providing a clear description of the local area.  A statistical section complements the narrative.
     Additional statewide sections include a description of Kansas government, a list of state business regulations, regional councils, economic regions, various geographical and climatological regions and state water resources.  This source will be useful to Kansas researchers needing current local information.

CAPPER/MRI QUICK-FACT BOOK OF KANSAS.
Midwest Research Institute and Capper Press, comp.  Topeka, KS:  CapperPress, 1990.  (Mabee Library - REF.
F676 .C3 1990)
by Rachel Vukas

     Did you know that Fort Leavenworth is the oldest army fort in continuous existence west of the Mississippi?  Or that Kansas ranks first in the nation in helium production?  Or that William Cody earned the name of Buffalo Bill by winning a buffalo shooting contest near Oakley in 1868?
     Intersting facts and figures are abundant in the CAPPER/MRI QUICK-FACT BOOK OF KANSAS and presented in an attractive, readable design.  Subjects covered include history, government, finance, the arts and industry.
     Also included are brief biographies of famous Kansans, a mileage chart, a historical timeline and a calendar of annual festivals and events. For ease of use, an index is provided and each chapter is outlined by a table of contents.  The book is also fun to browse through and would be an excellent choice for light reading before falling asleep.

FALL PROGRAM

Encounter on the Plains
by Wilma Rife, Mabee Library

     "The Coronado Legacy: Encounter of Culutres on the Plains" is the title of a symposium that will be held on October 19 on the Washburn campus.  Speakers include Dr. Ronald McCoy, Emporia State University, who will describe the Spanish-Indian encounter, the changes that occurred in both groups as a result of the encounter, and Coronado's vision of Quivira as an ongoing theme in the region's history.
     Thomas Fox Averill, Washburn University, will discuss the image of Coronado in Kansas literature, the symbolism of the first European visitor being pervasive in regional poetry and continuing as a loaded "symbol" for Kansans, regardless of ethnicity.  Other discussions will deal with the impact of the introduction of or reintroduction of the horse on the Plains Indian Culture and the contrasting religious beliefs of the conquistidor and the Native American. 
     This seminar is a part of the series of programs planned throughout the state for the 1991-92 anniversaries of the Columbus and Coronado expeditions to the "New World."  Programming emphasis is on the initial and continuing encounter of cultures rather than on "discovery," since that world was new only from a European perspective.
     The symposium will be held in Henderson on October 19 at 9 a.m.


NOTES FROM THE DIRECTOR
by Ross Johnson, Director of Washburn Center for Kansas Studies

     This is the first newsletter of the Washburn University Center for Kansas Studies.  We plan to print at least one and possibly two per year.  Each will include a description of the Center's activities, a list of upcoming state wide activities and/or celebrations, a book review and a list of the Center's publications.
     The Washburn Center for Kansas Studies originated at Washburn University in 1988, and it has four major goals:
1.  To encourage Kansas studies,
2.  To create resources and provide information about Kansa resources at Washburn University and around the state,
3.  To offer programming and courses on Kansas topics,
4.  To conduct outreach programs that focus on Kansas, its past, present and future.

Publications available:

KANSAS LITERATURE IN PRINT 1989 - $2.00
RESOURCE GUIDE FOR KANSAS STUDIES - $1.00
SOURCES IN KANSAS HISTORY 1991 - $2.00
THAT TRICK OF SILENCE - Steven Hind - $5.50.
     These may be purchased through the Washburn University Bookstore,
Washburn University, 1700 College, Topeka, KS  66621.  Make checks payable
to Washburn University.  (Kansas residents add 5.25 percent sales tax.)

CENTER PLANS TO PROPOSE A MINOR IN KANSAS STUDIES

     The Washburn Cneter for Kansas Studies in proposing a minor in Kansas
studies.  Ten courses have been identified that could be part of this
minor.  These are:
AN372 Archeological Field School
BI170 Kansas Ecology
EN170 Kansas Literature
EN190 Kansas in the Movies
EN199 Kansas Folklore
HI222 Kansas History
HI317 Topeka & the Urban Experience in American History
HI322 Kansas History
PO107 American State & Local Government
PO307 Internship in State & Local Government

     Three of the courses would have some restrictions.  Students could
take either HI322 or HI222, an educational television course, but not both
could count toward the minor.  PO107 has a number of prerequisites and
requires consent.  AN372 is available only through other universities in
the state.