Master of Criminal Justice

Master of Criminal Justice

Graduate Course Descriptions

NOTE: Enrollment in all graduate courses requires graduate status or permission of Instructor, Program Director or Department Chair.

CJ 600 Seminar in Criminal Justice Systems (3)

Professional graduate seminar designed to engage the first-semester criminal justice graduate student in the analysis of the array of issues in the process of justice administration. Exploration of the origins and significance of key issues influencing the rise and development of the criminal justice administrative theory and practice within the criminal justice system.  Prerequisite:  Graduate status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduate.

CJ 601 Seminar to the Masters of Criminal Justice Program (3)

This course will expose students to graduate level study expectations prior to or in conjunction with their first year in the MCJ program at Washburn University. Students will be exposed to or gain a better understanding of appropriate graduate level writing, such as research paper composition, citing sources, and avoiding plagiarism. Various activities relating to data gathering, such as resources provided by the University library and other University sources of information, will be reviewed. Students will also be introduced to the Criminal Justice faculty in this class as well as being encouraged to consider career path possibilities after earning a MCJ degree from Washburn University.

CJ 602 Criminal Justice Research (3)

The student will be able to develop and implement basic research designs and interpret findings. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be examined. Instruction and application will focus upon criminal justice issues and the impact of criminal justice research upon the profession.  Prerequisite:  Graduate status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduates.

CJ 603 Issues in Criminal Procedure (3)

Current significant issues in criminal procedure will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed upon significance of recent judicial decisions to both enforcement and corrections. Additionally, the relationship between the judiciary and the other segments of the criminal justice system will be examined. Methods for conducting legal research will be examined:  Prerequisite:  Graduate status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduates.

CJ 604 Seminar in Criminal Justice Organization and Management (3)

Application of organizational, administrative and management principles in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Course will examine issues in organizational structure, administration, problem solving, planning, and budgeting.  Prerequisite:  Graduate status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduate.

CJ 605 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3)

Examination of issues of professionalism and ethical behavior within the criminal justice profession. Key issues examined will include professional behavior of the individual and the agency. Current topics, such as sexual harassment, accreditation, maintenance of standards, and community relations will be significant topics of focus.  Prerequisite:  Graduate Status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduate.

CJ 610 Corrections in the United States (3)

A study of the policies which affect modern correctional agencies in the United States. Corrections will be examined from a historical prospective to provide a benchmark for the analysis of current and future trends.

CJ 620 The Role of Law Enforcement in the United States (3)

A study of the policies and human issues affecting law enforcement agencies in the United States. Law enforcement will be examined from a historical prospective with analysis of current activities and expected future trends.  Prerequisite:  Graduate Status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduate.

CJ 625 Seminar in Criminological Theory (3)

Theories of criminal justice are traced from the 1700’s through modern times. Theories of crime causation and criminal behavior will be discussed.

CJ 630 Correctional Administration (3)

The course will develop students’ capacity to develop and evaluate policies and procedures in all parts of the correctional administration arena. Judicial decisions which impact the legal status of the operation of correctional institutions and offender confinement will be examined.

CJ 635 Organized and White Collar Crime (3)

Examination of organized crime, white collar crimes, and gang activity in the United States. Focus will be on the historical development of these criminal patterns with an examination of current activities as well as proposed intervention theories.

CJ 640 Seminar in Legal Issues in Enforcement (3)

Current significant issues in enforcement administration will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed upon significance to federal, state, and local enforcement administrators, their agencies, and their communities.  Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduate.

CJ 645 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3)

Study of the criminal justice systems of four major countries. Each country’s different philosophical and practical approaches to criminal justice will be studied and compared. Field study will be utilized when possible.

CJ 650 Community Corrections (3)

The course will examine the traditional practices of probation and parole, as well as newer community methods. The major focus will be on the organization and integration of community-based programs into the modern criminal justice system.

CJ 655 Juvenile Justice & Delinquency (3)

A study of delinquency prevention, investigation of juvenile crime, disposition of offenders, and juvenile courts.  The Seminar will include an examination of the roles and interaction of juvenile agencies’ operations and the administrative challenges to them as well as a review of the due process considerations mandated by courts.

CJ 660 Seminar in Operational and Staff Planning (3)

Examination of the principles and practical application of operational and staff planning as applied to law enforcement agencies. Emphasis will be placed on the development and implementation of organizational goals and objectives, strategic, and tactical planning and operational needs assessment.  Prerequisite:  Graduate Status or permission of the instructor for senior level undergraduate.

CJ 670 Correctional Law (3)

An examination of correctional law as related to probation and parole, juvenile and adult institutions, local jails, legal liabilities, and legal research.

CJ 675 Problems & Practices in Judicial Administration (3)

Examination of the problems that face judicial administration and how those problems affect other elements of the criminal justice system.

CJ 680 Staff Development in Criminal Justice (3)

A study of the role of staff development in the management of human resources in criminal justice, and effective staff development methods and techniques. Emphasis will be placed on training and human resources development in criminal justice, organizationally determined outcomes, training needs assessment, performance standards, and assessment.

CJ 685 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3)

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken more than one semester for variable credit.  Prerequisite:  Consent from instructor.

CJ 690 Directed Readings in Criminal Justice (1-3)

This course offers an opportunity for students to explore topics of contemporary interest that are not covered in the standard course offerings.

CJ 692 Analytical Research and Statistics (3)

Statistical methods and computer applications are covered as they relate to survey research, agency evaluation, and content analysis. Qualitative methods are also taught, and include field methods, historical research, and legal bibliograpy.  Prerequisite:  successful completion of CJ 602 Research Methods.

CJ 693 Capstone Experience (3)

The course is designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in the criminal justice graduate program and related areas so the student has a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the criminal justice career field.

CJ 699 Thesis (6)

May be directed by any member of the criminal justice graduate faculty who accepts responsibility for supervising the thesis. The thesis topic must be pre-approved by the faculty advisor who serves as the student’s graduate committee chair. The student normally conducts original empirical research which involves the collection and analysis of new data, or re-analyzing existing data to arrive at certain conclusions. The written Thesis report is submitted to the student’s Thesis Committee. An oral defense of the Thesis is required for graduation.