Professional Development

For More Information
Thomas Underwood, Ph.D., (785) 670-1242

thomas.underwood@washburn.edu

Conference Presentations

The professionals affiliated with the JCVVS have presented at professional national as well as international conferences. JCVVS conference topics are listed under a series of themes or key areas. Topics may appear in more than one area.

The topics are described as a typical 1 to 1.5 hour presentation, though most could easily be expanded to three hours and some are portions of multi-day workshops.

For more information and to contract for service, contact Thomas Underwood.

Justice System / Restorative Justice

Best Practices in Victim Advocacy: Police, Courts, Corrections

Patricia Dahl

This workshop will provide a concise overview of some of the latest “best practices” in victim advocacy across the three major components of the criminal justice system: the police, the courts, and corrections. Topics, techniques, and tips will focus specifically on direct services and community partnerships.


Circles of Support and Accountability (COSA): An Evaluation for Effectiveness and Victim Impact

Bernadette Muscat

Circles of Support and Accountability (COSA) are comprised of a group of volunteers who provide support and accountability to sex offenders in a designated community. This presentation highlights the results from a pre- and post- COSA evaluation from the perspectives of core members (sex offenders), circle members (community volunteers), and probation officers. The impact of this type of program on victims will be discussed.


Creating a Victim Service Program for Inmates Under Correctional Supervision

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation will be based upon a multi-year study of females incarcerated in jails and prisons across four states. The findings are based upon focus groups with over 400 females regarding their experiences with violence and safety. The presentation will specifically focus on the creation of victim services including avenues for investigation, reporting, and service provision for inmates who have experienced violence while incarcerated


Intimate Partner Violence: What Does this Look like for Female Inmates in Jails and Prisons?

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation will be based upon a multi-year study of females incarcerated in jails and prisons across four states. The findings are based upon focus groups with over 400 females regarding their experiences with intimate partner violence of violence and safety while incarcerated. The interviews were used as the basis for the adaptation of the "Power and Control Wheel" to expressly outlined the experiences that women have with intimate partner violence while under correctional supervision.


Role of Restorative Justice for Victims of Family Violence

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation provides an overview of the principles of restorative justice and the dynamics of family violence. The presentation explores the efficacy of restorative justice as an option for victims of family violence. The pros and cons of restorative justice are addressed, as well as the safety mechanisms that must be in place for restorative justice to be a viable option for victims of family violence.


Violence and Safety Issues for Female Inmates in Prisons and Jails

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation will be based upon a multi-year study of females incarcerated in jails and prisons across four states. The findings are based upon focus groups with over 400 females regarding their experiences of violence and safety while incarcerated.

Professional and Organizational Issues

Collaboration: Building Organizational Partnerships for Change

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation provides an overview of the mechanics of building collaborative organizational partnerships to bring about change at the organizational, societal, and/or policy levels. The presentation will include a discussion about the various strategies to build partnerships, as well identifying and overcoming obstacles to change. Specific examples of organizational collaboration will be examined and evaluated to enhance learning and comprehension of key concepts.


Cultivating Passion in the Multi-Disciplinary Team

Aria Trudeau Hartman

This interactive session will reveal how even the briefest interactions with the multi-disciplinary team can impact the positive moments in your work. Learn essential lessons to cultivate a culture of passion. In addition, the session will focus on developing relationships to address unique culturally needs, such as multi-disciplinary team relationship in Indian country.


Essentials for Effective Presentations

Thomas Underwood

Public speaking is generally recognized as a stressful, anxiety inducing activity that most people prefer to avoid. But as professionals, victim service and allied service providers are often called upon to present information to groups of various sizes and of different audiences, such as the general public, colleagues, policy makers, and other executives. The focus of this workshop discussion of key elements for making brief presentations, including critical presentation “do’s and don’ts,” use of visual aids, and individual qualities that can be strengthened for improved performance.


Fostering Innovation in Victim Services

Thomas Underwood

To what extent does your organization innovate, that is, create viable new offerings – not just products, but new ways of doing and new forms of engagement – to better serve victims of crime? This session explores innovation and its key elements as a framework for program leaders and professional staff.


Leadership in Victim Services

Thomas Underwood

This session introduces key concepts of leadership with discussion and application as it relates to the unique aspects of victim services. This exploration includes the identification of characteristics and attributes, understanding of key leadership theories and leadership styles, and a discussion of followership as a critical condition for leadership. This exploration is core to further understanding and planning for leadership of self and organization.


Learning Styles in Victim Assistance

Thomas Underwood

Learning styles refer to the various approaches or ways people learn. Whether it is learning about themselves, their relationships, the justice system, or recovery resources, victims of crime are in a state of continuous learning and the victim advocate serves to facilitate the learning process. This workshop will explore various learning style models with application to victim assistance for better organizational and professional responses that may enhance victim learning.


Organizational Responses to Stress, Burnout, and Vicarious Trauma

Thomas Underwood

Victim service professionals regularly face challenges and circumstances that exacerbate common work stressors. Frequent exposure to violence and tragedy, difficult work conditions, and other stressors common in victim services may affect service providers emotionally, socially, and physically thereby impacting their ability to serve victims of crime in a complete and professional manner. While these challenges are commonly acknowledged, organizations do not always respond in a proactive or effective manner. This workshop will explore sources of stress with particular focus on those that are organizational or professional in nature. Participants will identify organizational strategies that may be considered to prevent and cope with the negative impact of stress.


Professionalization of Victim Services

Thomas Underwood

This interactive workshop will explore the occupation of victim services as an emerging profession. Structural and attitudinal components of a profession are presented and considered for application. Participants will consider possible responses to enhance victim services as a profession with discussion of specific strategies for implementation.

Stress, Burnout, and Vicarious Trauma

Individual Responses to Stress, Burnout, and Vicarious Trauma

Steve Walker

Victim service professionals regularly face challenges and circumstances that exacerbate common work stressors. Frequent exposure to violence and tragedy, difficult work conditions, and other stressors common in victim services may affect service providers emotionally, socially, and physically thereby impacting their ability to serve victims of crime in a complete and professional manner. This workshop will explore the impact of stress on the individual and strategies for individual responses.


Organizational Responses to Stress, Burnout, and Vicarious Trauma

Thomas Underwood

Victim service professionals regularly face challenges and circumstances that exacerbate common work stressors. Frequent exposure to violence and tragedy, difficult work conditions, and other stressors common in victim services may affect service providers emotionally, socially, and physically thereby impacting their ability to serve victims of crime in a complete and professional manner. While these challenges are commonly acknowledged, organizations do not always respond in a proactive or effective manner. This workshop will explore sources of stress with particular focus on those that are organizational or professional in nature. Participants will identify organizational strategies that may be considered to prevent and cope with the negative impact of stress.

Substance Abuse

Substance Abuse and Victimization

Steve Walker

This workshop will provide an overview of the field of substance abuse: theoretical models, treatment models, intervention, and especially assessment. Statistics regarding the co-occurrence of substance abuse and victimization will be reviewed. The core purpose of this presentation will be to assist victim advocates in developing their own assessment tools.

Trauma

Neurobiology of Trauma

Lee LaDue

Understanding how the brain works and changes during times of trauma helps us understand survivor’s behaviors during and after the trauma. This workshop will look at counter-intuitive behaviors of crime victims and why these reactions and behaviors are very normal based on how our brains are wired to respond. This understanding is changing how we help survivors recover and completely changing how we investigate the crimes of sexual violence, domestic violence and other violent crimes.


Individual Responses to Stress, Burnout, and Vicarious Trauma

Steve Walker

Victim service professionals regularly face challenges and circumstances that exacerbate common work stressors. Frequent exposure to violence and tragedy, difficult work conditions, and other stressors common in victim services may affect service providers emotionally, socially, and physically thereby impacting their ability to serve victims of crime in a complete and professional manner. This workshop will explore the impact of stress on the individual and strategies for individual responses.


When Talk Therapy is Not Enough: Coping Tools and Skills for Survivors of Sexual and Physical Trauma

Lee LaDue

At the beginning stages of healing, many survivors just want to find healthy ways to cope with the effects of the trauma. This workshop provides advocates and counselors with a variety of tools you can offer to help the survivor with a variety of after effects including flashbacks, nightmares, grief, anger and trust. These can be used in individual counseling or group settings.

Types of Victimization

College Student's Attitudes of Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation focuses on a survey of 750 university students and their attitudes regarding intimate partner violence, sexual Assault, and stalking. The survey was designed to determine what students know about intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking in terms of factual information, myths, stereotypes, laws, and the elements of stalking/cyberstalking. The survey also asks students what they know about victim service provision both on-campus and in the larger community. The results from this survey were used to update the campus policies and procedures for addressing stalking, to develop and implement an educational awareness program for the campus, and the implementation of on-campus victim services.


Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

Sharon Sullivan

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimate 300,000 U.S. children are victims of commercial sexual exploitation. This presentation explores the lives of prostituted children, how they fall prey to traffickers, and what is needed to help them escape prostitution. We will discuss policies, programs and attitudes that benefit child victimized by the commercial sex industry.


Dating and Domestic Violence: Understanding the Barriers to Leaving and Developing Effective Techniques to Empower Victims to Get Out

Lee LaDue

This workshop covers the basic dynamics of dating and domestic violence and how it looks from the victim’s perspective. The barriers and effective strategies for the victim at each stage, from contemplation to actually leaving, will be reviewed. Resources such as primary aggressor models and threat assessments will be discussed in the context of all responders working together to create safety for victims and effective system responses for abusers.


Helping the Non-Offending Caregiver Understand Child Sexual Abuse

Aria Trudeau Hartman

Sexually abused children are different ages, live in different places, and go to different schools but some share a very common denominator: a non-offending caregiver who

doesn’t believe them; they just cannot believe the allegations can be true!. This workshop is offered to helping professionals who provide services to secondary victims. Foundation level child sexual abuse material will be explored to prepare service providers with the knowledge and skills to effectively assist caregivers in the aftermath of their child’s disclosure.


Helping Victims of Human Trafficking

Sharon Sullivan

This presentation details best practices for a victim-centered, strengths-based approach to helping survivors of human trafficking. Experts estimate survivors of human trafficking need two to three years of services to overcome their unique experiences. This presentation will enumerate productive strategies to work with and support survivors.


Human Trafficking and Domestic Violence: Intersections and Deviations

Sharon Sullivan

Many domestic violence shelters are serving human trafficking victims--whether they realize it or not. Victims arrive at shelters because they have nowhere else to go. This presentation discusses the similarities and differences between domestic violence and human trafficking victims and how shelters can support human trafficking survivors.


Human Trafficking in the United States

Sharon Sullivan

According to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center, 1.5 million U.S. citizens are trafficked in the United States. This presentation offers an overview of human trafficking in the United States, including the vulnerabilities that put people at risk, motivations of traffickers and how consumers contribute to the problem.


Intimate Partner Violence: What Does this Look like for Female Inmates in Jails and Prisons?

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation is based upon a multi-year study of females incarcerated in jails and prisons across four states. The findings are based upon focus groups with over 400 females regarding their experiences with intimate partner violence of violence and safety while incarcerated. The interviews were used as the basis for the adaptation of the "Power and Control Wheel" to expressly outlined the experiences that women have with intimate partner violence while under correctional supervision.


Johns: The Men Who Buy Sex

Sharon Sullivan

People who purchase sex drive commercial sexual exploitation. The majority of buyers are men, but most men don’t buy sex. Who are the men that do? Why do they buy people for sex? This presentation summarizes the research about “Johns” and discusses the ways that the demand for commercial sex impacts communities.


Sex Trafficking

Sharon Sullivan

Commercial sex is one of the most misunderstood aspects of Human Trafficking. What is the difference between a prostituted person, a prostitute and a sex worker? This presentation describes the realities of commercial sexual exploitation in the U.S. It will examine complex trauma and the trauma bond, supply and demand, and strategies to reduce sex trafficking.


Sexual Violence, Dating/Domestic Violence, and Stalking on College Campuses

Lee LaDue

Recently, there has been a lot of national attention on sexual violence, dating violence and stalking on college campuses lately. This workshop will provide information on what makes campuses unique and what factors might pose a higher risk of these crimes occurring. The various national laws and Department of Education policies that guide campuses responses will be reviewed to help providers/advocates work with college students more effectively. Best practices for campuses, community victim services and law enforcement working together will be covered.


Stalking

Lee LaDue

This workshop will cover the basic dynamics of stalking, the use of technology, and profiles of stalkers. Case studies will be used to learn effective tools in working with victims of stalking. Examples of community response team approaches will be reviewed that can lead to higher rates of prosecution for these crimes.


The Intersection Between Child Abuse and Witnessing Domestic Violence in the Forensic Interview

Aria Trudeau Hartman

Child abuse professionals know that there is a strong link between child abuse and intimate partner violence, and that it is not unusual for an abused child to disclose more than one form of abuse at the same time. This speaks to the importance of screening for witnessing domestic violence in every forensic interview. Ideas and examples for pre-meetings with non-offending caregivers and forensic interview questions will be discussed. Opportunities to share and reflect as a group will be provided.

University

College Student's Attitudes of Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

Bernadette Muscat

This presentation focuses on a survey of 750 university students and their attitudes regarding intimate partner violence, sexual Assault, and stalking. The survey was designed to determine what students know about intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking in terms of factual information, myths, stereotypes, laws, and the elements of stalking/cyberstalking. The survey also asks students what they know about victim service provision both on-campus and in the larger community. The results from this survey were used to update the campus policies and procedures for addressing stalking, to develop and implement an educational awareness program for the campus, and the implementation of on-campus victim services.


Sexual Violence, Dating/Domestic Violence, and Stalking on College Campuses

Lee LaDue

Recently, there has been a lot of national attention on sexual violence, dating violence and stalking on college campuses lately. This workshop will provide information on what makes campuses unique and what factors might pose a higher risk of these crimes occurring. The various national laws and Department of Education policies that guide campuses responses will be reviewed to help providers/advocates work with college students more effectively. Best practices for campuses, community victim services and law enforcement working together will be covered.

Victimology and Victim Services

History and Future Trends for the Victims Movement

Steve Walker

An overview of the movements that precipitated the Victims Movement will be presented followed by a brief discussion of the six stages of the Movement. The core of the presentation/keynote will be on future trends in the movement focusing on collaboration, restorative justice, and accountability.


How You Can Use Crime Victim Rights to Empower Your Clients

Lee LaDue

This interactive workshop provides participants with the knowledge of how to access your state’s crime victim rights and how to utilize the rights to not only empower the individuals you are working with but also to create systems change to be more responsive to crime victims’ needs.


Johns: The Men Who Buy Sex

Sharon Sullivan

People who purchase sex drive commercial sexual exploitation. The majority of buyers are men, but most men don’t buy sex. Who are the men that do? Why do they buy people for sex? This presentation summarizes the research about “Johns” and discusses the ways that the demand for commercial sex impacts communities.


Victimology: Past, Present, and Future

Thomas Underwood

Victimology offers an important role in the recognition of crime victims’ rights and services, but differing objectives and applications between researchers/academics and the field of practice has often resulted in misunderstandings and charges of irrelevancy to practice. This presentation provides a brief historical context of victimology, highlights of victimological research and application regarding some current issues, and a discussion of the need for enhanced collaboration between victimology and the field for a more hopeful future in victim rights and services.

Contract Fee

The base contract fee for conference presentations is $650 a day with an additional $650 for prep, plus travel and accommodations. Fees for plenary or other special events are subject to negotiation.