Center for Teaching Excellence and Learning (C-TEL)

Contact Us
Email: ctel@washburn.edu, location: Morgan Hall 204, phone: 785.670.2835 (CTEL), hours: 9-3 Mon-Fri

Student in sculpture class

Teaching Matters Learning Communities

teaching matters badge A Teaching Matters Learning Community (TMLC) is a group of faculty and staff who learn about teaching together. TMLCs are intensive semester or year-long experiences in which instructors are led through a structured process that allows them to learn about specific teaching strategies and create concrete innovations in their teaching practice.

Upcoming Schedule

Spring 2018

Teaching Matters: Strategies for Active Learning

January 10-12 from 1:00-3:30
Garvey room 231
Register Here

This Teaching Matters Learning Community (led by Amy Memmer and Jericho Hockett) is designed to facilitate faculty and staff explorations of student-centered active learning strategies, including developing and trouble-shooting activities, problems, and lessons. Participants will be asked to complete readings, short reflexive pieces, and some basic research. By the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Define the benefits and limitations of active learning strategies
  2. Practice a concrete set of active learning strategies in your classrooms, including through use of available active learning technologies
  3. Distinguish among strategies appropriate for different learning contexts (in person, online)
  4. Begin developing relevant active learning strategies
  5. Evaluate active learning teaching practices

Teaching Matters: Strategies for Active Learning

Wednesday, January 24, 1:00-2:15
Wednesday, February 7, 1:00-2:15pm
Wednesday, February 21, 1:00-2:15pm
Wednesday, March 7, 1:00-2:15pm
Wednesday, March 28, 1:00-2:15pm
Garvey room 231
Register Here

You only need to registered for this event (once you are registered on this event you will be automatically registered for all 5 dates).

This Teaching Matters Learning Community (led by Amy Memmer and Jericho Hockett) is designed to facilitate faculty and staff explorations of student-centered active learning strategies, including developing and trouble-shooting activities, problems, and lessons. Participants will be asked to complete readings, short reflexive pieces, and some basic research. By the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Define the benefits and limitations of active learning strategies
  2. Practice a concrete set of active learning strategies in your classrooms, including through use of available active learning technologies
  3. Distinguish among strategies appropriate for different learning contexts (in person, online)
  4. Begin developing relevant active learning strategies
  5. Evaluate active learning teaching practices

More to come...