Forrest Scene

February 2012 News Releases

Biology and chemistry students present research at state meeting

Eleven Washburn University students studying biology and chemistry and one alumnae presented the results of research at the recent Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Symposium in Kansas City, Mo.

The student scientists, the event provides them an opportunity to publicly present their research and to build collaborations across campuses.

Students participating and the titles of their research were:

Jayme Barnes, Ozawkie, senior, biology major, “Interactions of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 UL 34 Protein.”

Alicia Burris, Parsons, senior, biochemistry and biology major, “Effects of Perennial Homoelogous Chromosome Groups on Quality Characteristics in Perenneil Wheat Amphiploids.”

Samantha Corber, Topeka, junior, physics and chemistry major, “Exploring the Roles of DbpA and RrmJ in E. coli Ribosome Assembly.”

Diana Crain, Kansas City, Mo., senior, chemistry major, “Progress Towards a Multi-Gram Scale Synthesis of a Key Ingredient in the Synthesis of [4 6} Adamanzane.”

Taylor Easley, Topeka, senior, biology major, “Strategy of Complete DNA Sequence Analysis of the Ribosomal DNA Plasmid from Naegleria fowleri.”

Keenan Hogan, Lyons, senior, biology major, "The Role of MMP's in the Digitation of the Chick Limb."

David Hollenbeck, Tecumseh, undeclared, post baccalaureate, "The Role of MMP's in the Digitation of the Chick Limb."

Claire Hopps, Topeka, senior, biochemistry and psychology major, “Initial Studies for the Use of Sodium Amalgam for the Deprotection of Tosylamides.”

Carole Jontra, Rossville, senior, biology and biochemistry major, “A Preliminary Report of LC MS/MS Analysis of Common Ragweed Pollen.”

Matt Rush, Topeka, senior, chemistry major, “Progress Toward the Synthesis of an Expanded Oxophlorin.”

Kyle Schmidt, Hutchinson, senior, biology and biochemistry major, “Interactions of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 UL 34 Protein.”

Trent Snyder, Sabetha, senior, biology major, “Environmental Isolation of Thermotolerant Ameobae from Wolf Creek Generating Station Cooling Waters.”

Corey Suelter, Topeka, senior, biology major, “Mutation of Magnesium Ion Channels Affects Environmental Stress Responses in Bacillus subtilis.”

To develop life sciences researchers in Kansas, the K-INBRE supports the initiatives of inspiring outstanding undergraduates to pursue careers in biomedical research, enhancing research capacity through faculty development and retention and expanding the biomedical research infrastructure among participating universities.

Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence is a $44.2 million research initiative designed to boost biomedical research capacity and strengthen a life sciences work force for Kansas. Funded by the National Center for Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health, the K-INBRE serves students and faculty on 10 campuses.

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Dena Anson, university relations, (785) 670-1711

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